Your Sacred Self

Aristotle said that to know the self is the beginning of all wisdom.

Jungian analytical psychology indicates that the self is an archetype. It represents the totality of mind and body. Considered the equivalent of the concept of supreme deity or God image, it’s the union of opposites and the rich experience of awe. According to Jung, experiencing the Self is similar to a religious revelation.

Image by Benno Poeder
When you identify with your true self, you increase your sense of purpose and well-being and you feel more satisfied with the outcomes of your decisions.

Jung proposed that the archetype of the Self represents your unified unconsciousness and consciousness. The Self grows through a lifelong process known as individuation, where the many diverse aspects of your personality are eventually integrated into wholeness. To become whole is to experience a fuller sense of Self. This may be why it seems so natural to seek fulfilment. The search is based on the human urge to become whole.

Research has shown that when you identify with your true self, you increase your sense of well-being and purpose. Studies have also found that when you make decisions guided by your true self, you feel more satisfied with the outcomes of your decisions.

The integrated, congruent parts of your Self contain the richness of your knowledge and the depth of your life experience. And over time, this produces the wisdom you can draw on for guidance and insights.

Your true Self is sacred. The archetype of your Sacred Self is a dynamic force that propels you forward on your journey through life.

References

Schlegel, R. J., Hicks, J. A., Arndt, J., & King, L. A. (2009). Thine own self: true self-concept accessibility and meaning in life. Journal of personality and social psychology, 96(2), 473–490. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0014060

Schlegel, R. J., Hicks, J. A., Davis, W. E., Hirsch, K. A., & Smith, C. M. (2013). The dynamic interplay between perceived true self-knowledge and decision satisfaction. Journal of personality and social psychology, 104(3), 542–558. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0031183

Schmidt, M. (2022, 17 February). Individuation and the self. Society of analytical psychology. https://www.thesap.org.uk/articles-on-jungian-psychology-2/about-analysis-and-therapy/individuation/

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